Grand Lake Meadows
 


 

 

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Ferns, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Ferns, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Richard Goodick
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Richard Goodick
Lily pads and flowers, Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of

Lily pads and flowers, Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Keith McKenzie

Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Duncan Campbell
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Duncan Campbell
Plants
 
Grand Lake is large enough (more than 16,000 hectares) to have a moderating influence on the climate of the Meadows.  The lake acts as a heat sink, storing heat in the summer and releasing it in autumn, extending the number of frost-free days. 
 
This region has the highest temperatures in the province.  A wide range of tree species grows here including burr oak, ironwood, basswood, butternut, white ash, green ash and, especially, silver maple.  The seedlings of the silver maple can survive long periods of flooding.
 
In addition to the tree species, 13 shrub species can be found here including speckled alder, which provides habitat and food for many wildlife species, as well as willow, elderberry, striped maple and red osier dogwood. 
 
Ground vegetation in the Meadows includes 66 species recently counted and documented in a study conducted by the New Brunswick Federation of Naturalists.
 
Most of the meadows are low shrub meadow in which the woody vegetation is lower than 1.5 meters.  The water table here is at the surface so the plant roots are in saturated soil for most of the growing season.
 
Some of the meadows are herbaceous, bordered by trees.  Most of the plant species here are found throughout New Brunswick.  This herbaceous meadow is wetland with almost permanent water saturation. 
 
Timber Lake is a large pond in the middle of herbaceous meadow.  A number of rare species can be found below the water surface including Humped Bladderwort and the Thread-like Naiad, both considered extremely rare in the province.