Grand Lake Meadows
 


 

 

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Home > When : First Nations
 
Fish, drawing by Cheryl Bogart, Queens County Museum Collection
Fish, drawing by Cheryl Bogart, Queens County Museum Collection
Fiddleheads, drawing by Cheryl Bogart, Queens County Museum Collection
Fiddleheads, drawing by Cheryl Bogart, Queens County Museum Collection
Wolastoqew birchbark box, Queens County Museum Collection
Wolastoqew birchbark box, Queens County Museum Collection
Wolastoqew basket, Queens County Museum Collection
Wolastoqew basket, Queens County Museum Collection
First Nations
 
Wolastoqiyik and Mi’kmaq, from the time of their earliest ancestors, developed a way of life ideally suited to the environment of the Maritime region.  They knew their surroundings well and based their knowledge on lifelong observations and information passed down from earlier generations.  They were always able to tap the most plentiful species of fish and game, grains and seeds, fruits and vegetables.
 
First Nations communities followed the rhythm of the seasons and often moved or traveled to access the food and materials required for daily life.  To this day, stone tools and ceramics are found along the shorelines of Grand Lake indicating a previous camp or community.
 
In the spring, trees shed their bark for the making of containers and canoes.  Soon followed muskrat, gaspereaux and fiddlehead seasons.  In the post European contact period, by late spring and on into summer, chairs and baskets were made from ash until late July, when attention turned to the making of apple and potato baskets as the harvests approached. 
 
By the end of October, trapping and seasons were well underway and thoughts turned to preparations for a hard, cold winter.  Everything was made:  snowshoes, skis, sleds, harnesses and pack baskets.  Transit was very easy through the rivers, lakes and streams of the Meadows.  Spring, summer and fall they paddled; in winter they walked on the ice.