Grand Lake Meadows
 


 

 

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Grand Lake Meadows wetlands, courtesy of David Hamilton
Grand Lake Meadows wetlands, courtesy of David Hamilton
Grand Lake Meadows wetlands, courtesy of Duncan Campbell
Grand Lake Meadows wetlands, courtesy of Duncan Campbell
Swamp Loosestrife, Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of David Hamilton

Swamp Loosestrife, Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of David Hamilton

Baby Ducks, Grand Lake Meadows wetlands, courtesy of Brigitte Noel

Baby Ducks, Grand Lake Meadows wetlands, courtesy of Brigitte Noel

Marshes
 
Wetlands account for in excess of 75 % of the surface area of the Grand Lake Meadows. Several different wetland types have been described. Roberts (1992) identified five wetland types: forested, emergent marsh, shrub swamp, aquatic bed and unconsolidated bottom whereas Papoulias, Chaplin, and Bishop (2006) identified seven wetland types, four aquatic zones and as well as floodplain forest.
 
This great variety of wetland types is a function of the diversity of plant communities found here which in turn is governed by various factors including soils, elevation and drainage. Both studies noted that shrub meadow or swamp is the primary wetland type and represents about 46 % of the total wetland extent. These shrub wetlands are dominated by such plant species as: Speckled Alder, Meadowsweet, Sweet Gale, Willows, Leatherleaf and Black Holly.
 
Emergent wetlands contribute approximately 24 % of the wetland total and the main plant species are: Swamp Loosestrife, Marsh Cinquefoil, Arrowhead, Sedges, Freshwater Cordgrass, Three-way Sedge, Bulb-bearing Water hemlock, Beggar-ticks, Bog Buckbean and American Bur-reed.
 
In addition to providing habitat for a great many species of wildlife the Meadows wetlands provide other functions such as: water quality, recreation, food, flood control and local climate moderation.