Grand Lake Meadows
 


 

 

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Welcome to the Grand Lake Meadows Website

American Bittern, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
American Bittern, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Duncan Campbell
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Duncan Campbell
Glossy Ibis, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Glossy Ibis, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Keith McKenzie
Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Keith McKenzie
Monarch Butterfly, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Monarch Butterfly, courtesy of Brigitte Noel
Grasses, Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Richard Goodick
Grasses, Grand Lake Meadows, courtesy of Richard Goodick

The Grand Lake Meadows is a unique fresh water wetland that lies between the waters of Grand Lake and the St. John River in central New Brunswick. It is one of the largest freshwater wetlands in Atlantic Canada and is noted for its complex but inter-related ecosystems and for its biodiversity.

Made up of about 116,000 hectares the Meadows are an exceedingly productive and precious resource for all living things. We are committed to preserving and protecting this special piece of New Brunswick for several reasons:

Wetlands are the cradle of life for a number of species. They serve as breeding, nesting and feeding grounds for a wonderful variety of wildlife that includes fish, amphibians, insects, birds and mammals.

The waters of the Grand Lake Meadows act as a heat sink storing heat in summer and releasing it in autumn resulting in a lengthened frost-free period, and generally moderating the local climate.

The wetlands of the Grand Lake Meadows help to reduce floods and ease drought by absorbing excess water and slowly releasing it somewhat like a sponge.

Wetlands reduce pollution by filtering out pollutants and excess nutrients from nearby lakes, rivers and streams.

Wetlands can serve to recharge valuable groundwater supplies.

In and near the Grand Lake Meadows a variety of recreational activities take place birding, photography, fishing, hunting, gathering, and boating. The Meadows are ours to enjoy, but always remember that human activities must not be allowed to diminish the quality of this valuable natural environment. Our concern and stewardship will help protect this unique part of our natural heritage.